Week 4 – the gears are clicking

Waking early today into the light in the sky. It’s high summer and my diurnal rhythms seem to be in sync with the bigger picture. Eyes open, into awareness, and the low-level adrenaline that’s come to be part of my life, kicks into play. I’m grateful for a day off for the light domestic duties, a spot of gardening, and a catch-up with the small screen entertainment. This helps to calm the mind and restore some balance after a week that has been one of the most intense so far in the rehearsal period.

If the infamous Week 3 is where you think you can’t act anymore, then Week 4 is where you have to fix that problem – if at all possible – because it’s into the theatre and tech week from Wednesday next week. The end of time in the comfort space of the rehearsal room is running out.

The week has been about running acts for smoothness of ‘attack’ on scenes and sections within and between scenes. It becomes a matter of relying on technique backed by intention and truthfulness of action playing. There is also a pruning of bits that are clunky or holding up action. This is often business, no matter how much fun, that gets in the way of the focus for the scene. Often it’s about the simple matter of timing. Ah, yes, it’s all in the timing. ‘Fixing and patching and finesse-ing’ was the name of the game yesterday morning – the final working day of a week’s full-on schedule.

Monday through Friday consolidated and developed work done previously: line runs to drill dialogue exchanges; scene work; costume changes; dialect sessions; singing; makeup and haircuts and, of course, the ongoing and increasingly finer work in developing character and relationships. Thank god for the precision and sensitivity of Andrea Moor; her patient direction and focus helped me immeasureably this week to slip into an ‘acting register’ (a term I just made up) that helped nailed an aspect of the character’s attitude that had been eluding me.

A real treat for the week was a session with Australian opera soprano Lisa Gasteen. Lisa joined us for an hour or so and gave us the drop on working life on the great operatic stages of the world – with a few delicious tidbits on the lifestyles of the rich and famous operatic stars thrown in. It’s all grist to the actor’s mill.

Here’s Lisa from one of her concert performances; what a star!

 

 

Author: Kate Wilson

Actor, director, teacher, dabbler with paint, serial traveller.